Six tips for choosing a polo-shirt

Polo-shirts are not only timeless, they are also convenient, requiring less ironing than shirts. Being a summer favourite, here are the most important elements to consider when buying a polo-shirt.

Opt for a fit that’s close to the body – even if you’re of the bigger type – without being too figure-hugging, hence too revealing of your physique. A loose fit will give a very casual (bordering on sloppy) look.

A polo-shirt’s collar should roll and sit neatly. One that looks flimsy will give the impression of poor quality. Unbuttoned, the collar opening should form a ‘V’. If it doesn’t, it’s likely that the collar is meant to be worn with all buttons done. Rolling up the collar is no longer considered stylish.

Since polo-shirts can be quite revealing of a man’s figure, especially girth and moobs. patterns and contrast-fabric are an effective way of camouflaging such areas, that one might not want to emphasise. In the case of isolated patterns, when these are located away from areas of concern, they divert attention away from such areas. Contrast fabric breaks up the silhouette thus, creating the illusion of a flatter surface. 

Following from the original Lacoste polo-shirt which featured the crocodile logo, polo-shirts, especially sportier designs usually feature the brand’s logo. On a solid colour, this can sometimes be the only detail present thus, adding a touch of design to the shirt. However, logos that are too dominant can at first appear to be part of the shirt’s general design, till they become all too recognisable.

Finally, a polo-shirt is generally meant to be worn untucked, which is why getting one in the right length is important. If you prefer wearing yours tucked in and you’re of the slender type, make sure it’s not loose-fitting and neither are the bottoms. Opting for a dressier polo with shorter sleeves for a look that’s reminiscent of the 1950s can give a touch of style, making it look less conservative.

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